James Bond Roulette System

The James Bond roulette system covers more than half of the table and is based on a staking plan used by Bond himself in one of Ian Fleming’s novels. The system is not found in any of the James Bond films, only the books, where he also used the Labouchere system.

The Staking Plan

Traditionally speaking, the James Bond is a flat betting system, meaning that you bet the same amount on every spin, although you can use a very risky progression which is explained lower down. For each spin, you place the following 3 bets:

  • £14 on 19 – 36
  • £5 on the 13 – 14 – 15 – 16 – 17 – 18 Line bet
  • £1 on 0

Your total bet on each spin will be £20, here’s an image of the bet that was taken from our Premium European Game where you can test the system for free yourself.

James Bond Roulette System

In total, there are 25 numbers where you win and 12 where you lose. There are four possible outcomes which are as follows:

  • The ball lands on any number from 19 – 36, resulting in a win of £8
  • The ball lands on 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 or 18, resulting in a win of £10
  • The ball lands on 0, resulting in a win of £16
  • The ball lands on 1 – 12, resulting in a loss of £20

James Bond System Doesn’t Overcome the Odds

Like all roulette strategies, the James Bond system does not overcome the odds that are built into the game. If you were to spin the wheel 37 times and each of the 37 numbers hit, this would be the overall result:

  • 1 Spin winning £16 with the 0 bet
  • 6 Spins winning £10 with the Line bet, resulting in a win of £60 overall
  • 18 Spins winning £8 with the 19 – 36 bet, resulting in a win of £144 overall
  • 12 Spins losing £20 when 1 – 12 hit, resulting in a loss of £240

16 + 60 + 144 – 240 = -20

So over the long term of play, you can expect to lose £20 every 37 spins using this system. Of course, the odds of spinning 37 different numbers in 37 spins are slim, so you could win more than you expect or lose more, it all depends on whether or not luck is on your side. The numbers above just represent what you can expect over the long term of play (thousands of spins) rather than short term.

Do Not Use a Progression to Claw Back Losses

As explained above, there are 12 spins where you will lose the entire £20 and over the long term of play, you can expect to lose slowly to the house edge. To try and get around this, some players use a progression: meaning that rather than betting the same £20 on every spin, they will increase their bets after a losing spin to try and claw back losses. Some websites even advocate the use of a progression without explaining the correct progression, maths or the huge risk that’s involved.

We DO NOT recommend using a progression because the rate at which your bets increase is very steep and you will find yourself betting huge amounts after just 2 consecutive losses. While you will be risking huge sums, your potential win is only small once your previous losses have been covered. On top of that, we’ve seen the James Bond system lose 9 times in a row before; the ball just kept landing on 1 – 12.

There’s no progression that can absorb that kind of loss without either going bust or hitting the table limits which is why we strongly recommend against the use of a progression. To further highlight this point, here’s how much you would risk and lose after just 3 losing spins:

Spin 1: £20 wagered in total (as shown higher up)

  • £14 on 19 – 36. Win = £28 minus £20 wagered = win of £8
  • £5 on the Line bet. Win = £30 minus £20 wagered = win of £10
  • £1 on 0. Win = £36 minus £20 wagered = win of £16

Spin 2: £49 wagered, plus the £20 wagered on Spin 1, resulting in a total of £69

  • £35 on 19 – 36. Win = £70 minus £69 wagered = win of £1
  • £12 on the Line bet. Win = £72 minus £69 wagered = win of £3
  • £2 on 0. Win = £72 minus £69 wagered = win of £3

Spin 3: £162 wagered, plus £49 from Spin 2 and £20 from Spin 1, resulting in a total of £231

  • £116 on 19 – 36. Win = £232 minus £231 wagered = win of £1
  • £39 on Line bet. Win = £234 minus £231 wagered = win of £3
  • £7 on 0. Win = £252 minus £231 wagered = win of £21

The numbers above may be confusing the first time you read them but what they show is: how much you need to bet on each spin, how much each bet will win if the ball lands on them, and what the total win will be once the previous wagers have been subtracted.

As you can see, after just 3 consecutive losses (the ball landing on 1 – 12) a total of £231 has been wagered and the potential win on Spins 2 and 3 is much smaller than Spin 1, despite the fact that much more money is being risked.

At first glance, you may think that the rate of progression in the example is far too high but it’s the only way to cover the previous losses. As pointed out higher up, we’ve seen the ball land on the first Dozen (1 – 12) 9 times consecutively and the numbers above only cover 3 losses which is why we don’t recommend using any kind of progression with this strategy.

If you really want to use a progressive system, you would be better of using the Fibonacci, D’Alembert or even the Martingale which all have slower rates of progression (but like any progressive system, still have their own risks). The James Bond roulette system should be seen as flat betting only.

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